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geowizard
08-24-2012, 06:09 AM
A recent Geophysical survey revealed a hidden pluton near Ophir.

http://www.alaska-gold.com/goose_egg.jpg

I have coined the pluton the "Ophir Pluton".

These structures are important for prospectors to know about. Plutons are surrounded by "contact intrusions" many of which are mineralized. In the case of the Ophir Pluton, the intrusions are responsible for the outstanding gold nuggets found at Ganes Creek, Ophir Creek, Anvil Creek, Dodge Creek, Little Creek and Yankee Creek.

The lode gold sources of the hundreds of thousands of ounces of gold produced in these creeks has never been found. Til now. :)

- Geowizard

Reno Chris
08-24-2012, 07:52 AM
Well, I wouldn't say that the sources have actually been found - but many of the mineralized intrusions responsible for those placers are probably related to this pluton and syngenitic with it.

geowizard
08-24-2012, 04:04 PM
Chris,

I agree. There's more information at www.alaska-gold.com.

-Geowizard

geowizard
08-26-2012, 11:45 AM
Nome has had several large scale surveys done that covers east and west and includes the Council area.

The surveys show where much of the placer gold is coming from. Sources of the Casadepaga River gold can be defined.

but... nothing is happening. It's like being given a treasure map with red X's that show where to dig.

- Geowizard

TheSeeker
08-26-2012, 01:23 PM
Hi geowizard,
Can you give the T/R & section numbers of the four sections in purple at the center of the 'Ophir pluton'? The 'pluton' link on the site that you supplied the link to no longer functions, and I'm just curious to see where the pluton is on the topo map and its relation to Ganes Creek, etc. Thanks, Walter

geowizard
08-26-2012, 03:10 PM
TheSeeker,

You are right. I fixed the link. Refresh the page in case your computer stores the old page. The center is about 6 miles west of the runway at Ganes. The Pluton isn't actually centered on any of the gold producing creeks. The creeks run to the northeast; Dodge, Gold Run, Ophir, Anvil, Spruce, and Little Creek extend outward to the northeast like fingers from the pluton. Ganes runs along the southern border of the pluton from southwest toward the northeast. This direction coincides with the Kuskokwim fault zone and the larger trend of the Tintina Gold Province.

Is this the Goose that laid all those Golden eggs?

- Geowizard

Dreamer
08-28-2012, 02:29 PM
Hey Geo,

Do you have any idea what kind of pluton it is? I hate that word.

Dreamer

Bill Bohan
08-28-2012, 03:58 PM
Wiz,

Could you put a scale on your rainbow map and what where the references for the two overlays?

Size does matter . A pluton of batholithic proportion may zone your prospects to the margin of the magnetic signature only. A small pluton that is mineralized may intead be signatured by a magnetic low.
Thanks,
Bill

geowizard
08-29-2012, 08:09 PM
Dreamer,

It is probably a laccolith.

http://www.alaska-gold.com/laccolith.jpg

geowizard
08-29-2012, 08:19 PM
Here's the scale: (image courtesy of Alaska DNR, DGGS GPR 2011-2)

http://www.alaska-gold.com/residual_mag_scale.jpg

Dreamer
08-29-2012, 11:41 PM
Thank's Geo!

Dreamer

Bill Bohan
08-30-2012, 06:03 AM
Wiz, Is the grid on your first post made up of section lines? I meant scale as in inch /mile?

geowizard
08-30-2012, 07:22 AM
Bill.

Yes, those are section lines. The pluton is probably 10 miles x 10 miles or more depending on the cutoff you use. It doesn't qualify as a Batholith. The magnetic anomaly represented here is "large" enough to qualify as a "Pluton". That is significant from an exploration point of view. This survey has revealed a significant structural detail that was here-to-fore unknown. It creates a new paradigm in the interpretation of geology and potential sources of gold in the region.

- Geowizard

Bill Bohan
08-30-2012, 07:29 AM
This appears to be an overlay of two images. I like the way the pluton signature snugs into the margin of dipoles.

geowizard
08-30-2012, 09:35 AM
This is the original presentation of the survey as published from DGGS. You can go online to the Alaska DGGS website and view ALL of the Geophysical Reports (GPR's) from ALL over Alaska. Each GPR provides about a dozen different Magnetic, Resistivity, and other related survey presentations. This one is GPR 2011-2 and published in November 2011.

DGGS is planning another survey in September of areas North of Ophir, South of and North of Iditarod and also another survey near Farewell. These will be published in the spring.

- Geowizard

tvanwho
08-30-2012, 08:21 PM
I have no idea what your scientific terminology means?
Ps, where can I get good aerial views of the area around Ophir? USGS aerial views are about useless.Has Google mapped out that area in detail?

-Tom V., what is a Pluton anyway?

geowizard
08-31-2012, 06:20 AM
tvanwho,

Sometimes people use words I don't understand too. I look them up in the dictionary. That's what makes forums so interesting. The members use new words that ADD to your vocabulary.

All I can really say, is, these words are common terms found in the literature that is published on the subject. None of the terms are meant to be intimidating.

Look them up online using the available search engines and dictionaries including Wikipedia.

- Geowizard

Dreamer
08-31-2012, 07:45 AM
Tom,

Here are a few examples of plutons.

http://geotripperimages.com/Volcanism/Plutons%20and%20intrusions.htm

http://itc.gsw.edu/faculty/bcarter/physgeol/igrx/pluton2.htm

Definition of pluton

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pluton

They can be relatively small in size to gigantic.

The word Pluton, may have more meanings then any word I have ever heard of...LMAO!

Dreamer

tvanwho
09-03-2012, 12:26 PM
I don't think I have even opened a dictionary since high school, shame on me !! Except for the scrabble dictionary now and then. Been falling back on Wikipedia in the Internet age.
I seem to have stumbled on a quartz specimen in my rock collection.It is partly exposed white quartz and the rest of it is covered with a dark black, paper thin coating with rusty spots here and there, AND a chunk of bright yellow gold is sticking out of the black coating !! Unfortunately, I have no idea where the rock came from ? I know Jim H sent me some silver samples but I don't think it was part of that batch.
Unfortunately, both my digital cameras took a dunking in the Wabash river last month while out river prospecting and trying to escape the heat.Heck, I leaned over and my cell phone took a bath too,out of my shirt pocket, altho I was able to resurrect that one.
Another rock I picked up is fist size and reddish and has what looks like possible white quartz crystals in it. This definintely came from a glacial gold bearing creek in central Indiana. Should i cut it up to hopefully expose the potential crystals inside? Rock saw, sledge hammer, or what?

-Tom




tvanwho,

Sometimes people use words I don't understand too. I look them up in the dictionary. That's what makes forums so interesting. The members use new words that ADD to your vocabulary.

All I can really say, is, these words are common terms found in the literature that is published on the subject. None of the terms are meant to be intimidating.

Look them up online using the available search engines and dictionaries including Wikipedia.

- Geowizard

geowizard
09-03-2012, 02:00 PM
plu·ton noun \ˈplü-ˌtän\
Definition of PLUTON
: a typically large body of intrusive igneous rock

Hope this helps.

- Geowizard

Akson35
09-03-2012, 11:33 PM
Sometimes people use words I don't understand too. I look them up in the dictionary. That's what makes forums so interesting. The members use new words that ADD to your vocabulary.

All I can really say, is, these words are common terms found in the literature that is published on the subject. None of the terms are meant to be intimidating.

Look them up online using the available search engines and dictionaries including Wikipedia.

Thank you for adding this to the new words of the week. I think AKMINING should have a crossword with def. for Alaska mining. Something to think about. What would PLUTON be worth if it was the 1st word?

Geowizard: I was looking at newer reports for my area (Willow Creek Mining Dist.) I have found out some but I havent seen any with nice color like yours. What type of test is this? If one would ask how is this test made, can someone with the right tools make there own?

Steve Herschbach
09-04-2012, 06:10 AM
Dictionary? This is the 21st century. I highlight the word on my iPad and chose "define".

I have often thought on the fact that I have read geologic reports since I was a kid. I learned the lingo and think nothing about it as I read stuff like this. But I have realized looking at it in a different frame of mind as to how these reports are almost unreadable for a layman unfamiliar with the terminology. We may as well be speaking Greek, and in fact we often are. http://www.friesian.com/pluton.htm

Basically, knowing the words is another leg up on the other prospector.

geowizard
09-04-2012, 07:07 AM
The more I learn about iPads, the more I'm sold on getting one!

Steve, being a reknowned metal detectorist, you have seen the technology that's available. The questions have been asked on this forum and others... "What IF?...

What IF you could make a BIG metal detector and hang it from the bottom of a helicopter and fly over the tundra, back and forth and cover over 800 square miles?

What IF you could also get someone else to buy the gas? What new things do I need to learn? :)


Akson,

Here's a link to all of the geophysical mapping past, present and planned for the near future:

http://www.dggs.alaska.gov/geophysics/download/GPCandidAreas.pdf

My day job is designing hardware and software for new geophysical systems. A current project is one suggested by Steve a year or so ago. What is needed is a detection system to find the next level deeper nuggets. It opens a whole new - unexplored world of detecting.

- Geowizard

geowizard
09-04-2012, 07:17 AM
What is the physical difference between farm land in Kansas and the FT. Knox gold mine in Alaska?

If we didn't know there's gold at Ft Knox mine, what things could we measure with our helicopter that might give us a clue?

How does a metal detector work? Can we make a BIG metal detector?

Yes!

- Geowizard